Friday Fictioneers – My Favourite Food

PHOTO PROMPT Copyright-Sandra Crook

Copyright – Sandra Crook

To see instructions on how to submit your own 100 word story based on the prompt, see Friday Fictioneers Central.

“The Lord doesn’t have time for goats that run amok, getting filthy from head to foot! Are you a goat?”

My grandmother scolded me as I scrubbed my hands, but my head was still filled with my adventures outside, where I was an explorer.

When I’d saved enough money, I escaped from that house and from Grandma, who shook her head instead of saying goodbye.

I travelled around the world and immersed myself in cultures so dissimilar from my sterile upbringing; the explosive colours, the sound of different languages, and exotic foods

My favourite dish of all was goat curry.

Friday Fictioneers – Treasure From Fairyland

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Copyright – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

To submit your own 100 word story about the photo prompt, click here. I value constructive criticism, so please feel free to be honest in your comments.

She was the size of two dragonflies and glowed like hot magnesium, so bright that Josie could never look straight at her. At night, Josie would hear things that nobody else could: The flutter of wings, tiny footsteps on her pillow, and the hum of magic. The fairy didn’t speak but she patiently listened to Josie’s tales of anguish. Occasionally, she would bring Josie trinkets and trophies from an imagined fairyland, which Josie would play with in secret.

When other children in the orphanage complained that their possessions were going missing, Josie wasn’t worried. The fairy would protect her treasure.

Alastair’s Photo Fiction – I Can’t Hand Out Happiness.

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Copyright – Alastair Forbes

This prompt came from Alastair’s Photo Fiction Blog.

My name is Paul, and I grew up in Bridlington, in a squalid, one-bedroom apartment. My mother used to tell me, “It’s you and me against the world, Paul, it’s you and me.” It never felt that way. No, I was on my own and I knew it. Throughout my childhood, I wasted hours on the beach, walking along the litter strewn front. The foil of empty crisp packets reflected stony clouds. During the peak season, I stayed away from the smells of waffles and the sight of children with their ice cream cones, or the jealousy would crush me.

I went into the army when I left school, made a few friends who still visit me now and then. When I returned, I had enough money to buy the cart. I painted it up, bought stock, and I somehow made enough profit to survive. Sometimes, when cycling around, I see a lonely looking child. I give them an ice cream, and hope it’s enough to get them through the day.

Alastair’s Photo Fiction – The Master

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Copyright – Alastair Forbes

This prompt is from Alastair’s Photo Fiction Blog.

The master raised his arms to the sky, his features declaring rapture.

 “We worship you, glorious god, Biher! Please bring us goodness! Bring us good weather!”

The master began to bow down before the wooden statue and followers did the same.

  “…Biher is a stupid name.” one of the followers muttered.

  “How dare you utter such blasphemy!” The master pointed down at the follower. “You’ll be exiled! You’ll be cursed with a thousand curses!”

  “It’s not even the real thing. It’s just a stupid souvenir mum got from Hawaii!” the follower cried.

  “You’ll be cursed with a million curses!”

  “This is stupid game!” The follower got up from the ground, brushing grass off her cotton sundress.

  “It’s not a game! You will really be cursed! You’ll be ugly forever and ever like you are now!” the master sniggered.

   “I hate you!”

   “I hate you more!”

   “I hate you the mostest!”

Alastair’s Photo Fiction – Waiting For The Shadow

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Copyright – Alastair Forbes

This prompt is from Alastair’s Photo Fiction.

Time isn’t silent anymore.

My grandparents have a large, beautiful house in the South. When I was younger, we visited every other weekend. If it was sunny, I’d spend most of the day in their garden. It was like another world to me. I was fascinated by the exotic looking plants and well-placed rockery. Best of all, there was a sun dial placed in the centre.

I’d stare at it, waiting for the shadow to move. I knew it did slide across the dial, just never when I was watching.

I have a feeling, if I looked at it now, I’d see the shadow steadily marching across the stone. I wait in the hospital room, linked to numerous tubes and machines, and I can feel time passing. I can hear it roaring past me. Unlike the flow of water, time doesn’t slow as the supply runs low. The last drops run the fastest.

Taking Back The Crown: Part Six

Sonya landed on her back, in the main room of the training ground, panting. Seta must have already been inside the room. Within seconds he was standing over her, looking at her injury. He yelled to someone outside the room to get the medic.

“Seta?” Sonya’s voice was weak.

“Yes? What happened to you?” Seta was trying to sit her up so he could look at the laceration on her back.

“I don’t think my mother’s coming back.”

“Do you have any other family? A home to go back to?” He was now attempting to stem the blood pouring from her wound. Sonya shook her head.

“It’s not safe.”

When the medic had used his magic to treat Sonya’s wound, she was taken upstairs to a small room with a slightly thicker futon than the one she’d been sleeping on.

“Whose room is this?” Sonya asked.

“It’s yours now.” Seta explained. “You can stay in this training ground and learn our ways. I’ve seen you meditating and doing your exercises, you’re capable of graduating from this school.” He paused. “I… I thought the elders would resist. They don’t like strangers. But… they trust me. And they have a feeling about you, they said.”

Sonya sat, silent, for a few moments before responding. “Thank you. For everything. But why?”

Seta frowned. “You’re just a child. You shouldn’t be on your own.” He told her to get some rest, and then left.

Sonya buried her head in her pillow. Just a child! If he knew who she was, he wouldn’t say that! She was a Litian heir. She possessed magical power that other magicians could only dream of. No injury could kill her. She felt like a fraud, pretending to be defenceless when in reality she was just a coward who didn’t know where else to go. Ashamed, she cried until she finally fell asleep.

Taking Back The Crown: Part One

This series is based on one of the back stories within TBAM. It’s split into nineteen parts and I’ll be posting each part daily, bar a couple of days when I’m away. I really loved writing certain parts of this story. I felt that Sonya’s character wasn’t explored a lot in TBAM, but this series should hopefully show how she became such a ruthless leader, and you’ll get to see her softer side. Be warned, this series is a bit more violent than my other work on here.

Blood, bone and brain matter were suddenly dispersed across the ornate circular table. The bang that had preceded this had come suddenly, in the middle of Naria’s speech. She’d been about to give a toast, to Sonya, congratulating her on reaching her tenth birthday. Not that reaching your tenth birthday is much of an achievement when you’re almost immortal, but it meant that Sonya’s official training would begin. She’d already done combat exercises and developed her magical abilities, but she’d never used them against real enemies. She’d never seen anything like this, or felt anything like Naria’s still-warm flesh splattered across her face.

There were shrieks and cries and everyone rushed towards the ballroom’s exit. Ladies tripped over their brightly coloured gowns in their attempts to escape. Windows smashed and tall, red Rutilus appeared. They poured in through the window frames, dropping down into the chaos. Another group of them must have waited outside to ambush those who ran through the ballroom doors. Party-goers were silenced mid-scream as the Rutilus used their magic to cut throats. Scarlet pools gathered on the stone floors and streaks appeared on the marble pillars. Trin was trying to fend off five at once while Sonya looked on, numb and shocked, at the senseless violence.

Suddenly, Trin grabbed Sonya’s arm and she felt the usual warm sensation as they transported. When the darkness lifted, a heavy drizzle was falling on them both. Water on the ground reflected the moonlight.

 “Sonya, wait here. I’ll come back for you when this is over.” Trin said quickly. “Don’t go back to the Palace until I come for you!”

Before Sonya could even reply, Trin had vanished.